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Picasso Sculpture Opens at MoMA, Picasso Ceramics at the MAAC

picasso-bull
picasso-bull

(Left) Pablo Picasso, Bull. Cannes, c. 1958. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Jacqueline Picasso. © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York . Source: moma.org. (Right) Pablo Picasso, Bull Under Tree. France, c. 1952. Leah Gordon Gallery, The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center [Gallery 18/212.872.1422]

Perhaps the most highly anticipated exhibition of the year, Picasso Sculpture opened yesterday at the Museum of Modern Art to breathless critical acclaim. There’s a good reason for the hype–Picasso guarded his sculpture so closely that it wasn’t until 1966 at the age of 85 that he agreed to a major sculpture exhibition. There has been no other sweeping survey of his sculpture since, so for many of us, this is the first time we are seeing the breadth of Picasso’s experimental imagination in 3-D.

Glazed earthenware face plate by Picasso

Glazed earthenware face plate by Picasso, polychrome colors depicting a face, France, c. 1963. Diameter: 9-3/4″ Leah Gordon [Gallery 18/212.872.1422] Click image for detail view.

Unlike in painting, where he was formally trained, sculpture was Picasso’s personal playground. Here, he experimented with form and materials, revisiting pieces throughout his lifetime, keeping them private in his studio like “members of his household.” A subset of his three-dimensional work that was available to the public? His wonderful Ceramics.

 Ceramic plate of “Bull Under Tree” by Picasso, 500 copies produced, listed in Catalogue Raisonne p. 89, Ramie Picasso (1881-1973), white earthenware clay with oxidized paraffin decoration, France, circa 1952. Diameter: 8-7/8″

Ceramic plate of “Bull Under Tree” by Picasso, 500 copies produced, listed in Catalogue Raisonne p. 89, Ramie Picasso (1881-1973), white earthenware clay with oxidized paraffin decoration, France, circa 1952. Diameter: 8-7/8″ Leah Gordon [Gallery 18/212.872.1422] Click image for detail view.

Many of the recurring motifs in both his painting and sculpture, such as “the bull” and “woman” are found again in the ceramic works he created in his later years. Beginning in the 1940s, Picasso created ceramic pieces throughout the last years of his life, beginning with plates and graduating to more complex forms such as pitchers.

Pablo Picasso Ceramic Pitcher "Woman."

Pablo Picasso Ceramic Pitcher “Woman.” Glazed earthenware pitcher of a woman. Signed and numbered 75/100. Illustrated in catalogue raisonne of Picasso Ceramics by Ramie, page 135, #300. Glazed earthenware, France, 1955. Leah Gordon [Gallery 18/212.872.1422] Click image for detail view.

Pablo Picasso, Vase: Woman, 1948, Vallauris, white earthenware painted with slips, 18¾34; x 6½34; x 4¼34;. ©2015 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/MUSÉE NATIONAL PICASSO, PARIS

On view at MoMA: Pablo Picasso, Vase: Woman, 1948, Vallauris, white earthenware painted with slips, 18¾34; x 6½34; x 4¼34;. ©2015 Estate of Pablod Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Musee National Picasso, Paris Source: artnews.com

The familiar brush strokes, such as the same wry smile on both ceramic “Woman” works, greet you like an old friend. For Picasso, his sculptures were much like old friends. The new exhibition at MoMA is a deep, intimate view of the lesser known 3-D Picasso. The Ceramics featured here are in essence, a way to keep close company with this Picasso in your own home. To inquire or learn more about the pieces featured here, contact Leah Gordon Gallery [Gallery 18/212.872.1422/leahgor50c@aol.com]. “Picasso Sculpture” is on view at MoMA September 14, 2015 through February 7, 2016.

Pablo Picasso Pottery Platter “Poisson Fond Blanc.”

Pablo Picasso Pottery Platter “Poisson Fond Blanc.” A glazed oval dish of white earthenware clay featuring a large fish in blue, yellow, and orange glazes. Signed and numbered 5/100. Illustrated catalogue raisonne of Picasso Ceramics by Ramie page 93, #168. White earthenware, France, 1952.
16-5/8″ long x 13-3/8″ wide x 1-3/8″ high. Leah Gordon [Gallery 18/212.872.1422] Click image for detail view.